I’m not happy when I’m writing, but I’m more unhappy when I’m not.
— Fannie Hurst (via writingquotes)

Stories I Want to Read But Am too Lazy to Write →

thewritingcafe:

  • Ancient Alexandrian-inspired fantasy.
  • Ancient Carthaginian-inspired fantasy.
  • Seriously, have you seen its port? That’s a major naval power filled with major opportunities for fight scenes at sea. And it’s pretty too.
  • Historical fiction or fantasy or sci fi about…

yeahwriters:

vintageanchorbooks:

"Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity." 
— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I really gotta read me some Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

What should I start with?

Be passionate about what you write, believe in your ability to convey timeless ideas, and let no one tell you what what you’re capable of.
— Christina Westover (via writersrelief)

oliviapopes:

favourite places i've been

↳ venice, italy

Most short stories have but one plot. The very best, however, have what I call a plot-and-a-half – that is, a main plot and a small subplot that feeds in a twist or an unexpected piece of business that ads crunch and flavor to the story as a whole.
— Elizabeth Sims (via thewritingrealm)

maxkirin:

A kind follower reminded me of that '7 Cardinal Rules of Life' post going around, and they asked me if I would ever do my take on them (that being, a writerly take). Well, seeing as how I’ve been running a Writer Positivity series for over 100 posts, I thought it would be a fun chance to collect some of my favorite advice!

PS: The above are not meant to be taken as ‘literal’ rules for writing, but rather advice for leading the lifestyle of a writer~ ♥︎

Looking for more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

Anonymous;
So, I have these two characters that eventually become a couple. How can I make sure they have "chemistry"? I see people talk about that with fictional couples all the time, but I don't really understand what it means or how to pull it off...

thewritingcafe:

Chemistry is when two characters have a strong, authentic, natural connection or attraction to one another. This term is most often used for characters who are romantically involved, since good chemistry usually involves sexual tension, but platonic relationships can have chemistry too.

Here are characteristics of characters who have good chemistry:

  • Attraction: This doesn’t necessarily mean that the characters are romantically and/or sexually attracted to one another, but it can. This means that characters naturally gravitated toward one another and that they are attracted to the other person’s mere existence.
  • Complement: These characters complement each other. Both are whole on their own (and should be developed that way), but when together they create a new kind of force. They work well together and other people see that. It’s like when two people are always known as a “package”. Everyone refers to them as being together because they’re always together and when they’re together, they seem more complete and balanced to other people.
  • Connection: Something connects these two characters. It could be because they share a back story, they live near each other, they have a similar hobby, they work at the same place, they’re both in school, or because they keep ending up in the same place at the same time.
  • Sexual Tension: Sexual tension is most often found when the characters are supposed to be romantically involved, but romance doesn’t have to happen if sexual tension occurs.
  • Authentic: When characters have good chemistry, their interactions are natural and authentic. This is difficult to pull off because it’s one of those things that just happens when you write.
  • Reaction: It’s called character chemistry for a reason! Think of characters like elements. Putting the right elements together creates a reaction. These characters need to fit together and their bond needs to create something new.
  • The Secret Formula: While there are certain characteristics that create chemistry between characters, it all depends on the characters themselves and how you write it. There’s no equation for creating chemistry that will always be successful. Sometimes chemistry between characters comes out naturally without the author’s intention.

Examples of Chemistry in TV Shows

Ten Rules for Query Letters →

maggie-stiefvater:

1. People overthink queries. Okay, so they are the only thing that an agent or editor might ever see of your work. So they have to embody everything about your personality and your books personality in a single page. So you will get absolutely nowhere if your queries suck,…